Athlete’s Foot Shoes

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Athlete's Foot Shoes

Fast facts on athlete’s foot Here are some key points about athlete’s foot. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Athlete’s foot is a fungal infection by a fungus known as Trichophyton Generally, OTC medications are adequate to treat athlete’s foot Sometimes, athlete’s foot can spread to the hands; this is called tinea manuum
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Athlete's Foot Shoes

Highlights Athlete’s foot is a fungal infection that affects the skin on the feet. It can also spread to the toenails or hands. It is contagious. Going barefoot in public places, such as locker rooms, is a common cause. Athlete’s foot — also called tinea pedis — is a contagious fungal infection that affects the skin on the feet and can spread to the toenails and sometimes the hands. The fungal infection is called athlete’s foot because it’s commonly seen in athletes. Athlete’s foot isn’t serious, but sometimes it’s hard to cure. However, if you have diabetes or a weakened immune system and suspect that you have athlete’s foot, you should call your doctor immediately.
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Athlete's Foot Shoes

Athlete’s foot is divided into four categories or presentations: chronic interdigital athlete’s foot, plantar (chronic scaly) athlete’s foot (aka “moccasin foot”), acute ulcerative tinea pedis, and vesiculobullous athlete’s foot. “Interdigital” means between the toes. “Plantar” here refers to the sole of the foot. The ulcerative condition includes macerated lesions with scaly borders. Maceration is the softening and breaking down of skin due to extensive exposure to moisture. A vesiculobullous disease is a type of mucocutaneous disease characterized by vesicles and bullae (blisters). Both vesicles and bullae are fluid-filled lesions, and they are distinguished by size (vesicles being less than 5–10 mm and bulla being larger than 5–10 mm, depending upon what definition is used).
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Athlete's Foot Shoes

Athlete’s foot is a form of dermatophytosis (fungal infection of the skin), caused by dermatophytes, fungi (most of which are mold) which inhabit dead layers of skin and digests keratin. Dermatophytes are anthropophilic, meaning these parasitic fungi prefer human hosts. Athlete’s foot is most commonly caused by the molds known as Trichophyton rubrum and T. mentagrophytes, but may also be caused by Epidermophyton floccosum. Most cases of athlete’s foot in the general population are caused by T. rubrum; however, the majority of athlete’s foot cases in athletes are caused by T. mentagrophytes.

Athlete's Foot Shoes

Athlete’s foot is a skin disease caused by a fungus, usually occurring between the toes. The fungus most commonly attacks the feet because shoes create a warm, dark, and humid environment which encourages fungus growth. Not all fungus conditions are athlete’s foot. Other conditions, such as disturbances of the sweat mechanism, reaction to dyes or adhesives in shoes, eczema, and psoriasis, may mimic athlete’s foot.
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Athlete's Foot Shoes

According to the National Health Service, “Athlete’s foot is very contagious and can be spread through direct and indirect contact.” The disease may spread to others directly when they touch the infection. People can contract the disease indirectly by coming into contact with contaminated items (clothes, towels, etc.) or surfaces (such as bathroom, shower, or locker room floors). The fungi that causes athlete’s foot can easily spread to one’s environment. Fungi rub off of fingers and bare feet, but also travel on the dead skin cells that continually fall off the body. Athlete’s foot fungi and infested skin particles and flakes may spread to socks, shoes, clothes, to other people, pets (via petting), bed sheets, bathtubs, showers, sinks, counters, towels, rugs, floors, and carpets.

Athlete's Foot Shoes

There are many topical antifungal drugs useful in the treatment of athlete’s foot including: miconazole nitrate, clotrimazole, tolnaftate (a synthetic thiocarbamate), terbinafine hydrochloride, butenafine hydrochloride and undecylenic acid. The fungal infection may be treated with topical antifungal agents, which can take the form of a spray, powder, cream, or gel. Topical application of an antifungal cream such as terbinafine once daily for one week or butenafine once daily for two weeks is effective in most cases of athlete’s foot and is more effective than application of miconazole or clotrimazole. Plantar-type athlete’s foot is more resistant to topical treatments due to the presence of thickened hyperkeratotic skin on the sole of the foot. Keratolytic and humectant medications such as urea, salicyclic acid (Whitfield’s ointment), and lactic acid are useful adjunct medications and improve penetration of antifungal agents into the thickened skin. Topical glucocorticoids are sometimes prescribed to alleviate inflammation and itching associated with the infection.
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Athlete's Foot Shoes

Athlete’s foot occurs most often between the toes (interdigital), with the space between the fourth and fifth digits most commonly afflicted. Cases of interdigital athlete’s foot caused by Trichophyton rubrum may be symptomless, it may itch, or the skin between the toes may appear red or ulcerative (scaly, flaky, with soft and white if skin has been kept wet), with or without itching. An acute ulcerative variant of interdigital athlete’s foot caused by T. mentagrophytes is characterized by pain, maceration of the skin, erosions and fissuring of the skin, crusting, and an odor due to secondary bacterial infection.
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Athlete’s foot infections can be mild or severe. Some clear up quickly, and others last a long time. Athlete’s foot infections generally respond well to antifungal treatment. However, sometimes fungal infections are difficult to eliminate. Long-term treatment with antifungal medications may be necessary to keep athlete’s foot infections from returning.
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Thick, tight shoes are more likely to trigger athlete’s foot because they squeeze the toes together, creating ideal conditions for the fungus to thrive. Experts say that plastic shoes, which warm and moisten feet the most, are more likely to bring on athlete’s foot than those made from other materials, such as leather or canvas.
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Globally, fungal infections affect about 15% of the population and affects one out of five adults. Athlete’s foot is common in individuals who wear occlusive shoes. Countries and regions where going barefoot is more common experience much lower rates of athlete’s foot than do populations which habitually wear shoes; as a result, the disease has been called “a penalty of civilization”. Studies have demonstrated that men are infected 2–4 times more often than women.
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Athlete’s foot, known medically as tinea pedis, is a common skin infection of the feet caused by fungus. Signs and symptoms often include itching, scaling, and redness. In severe cases the skin may blister. Athlete’s foot fungus may infect any part of the foot, but most often grows between the toes. The next most common area is the bottom of the foot. The same fungus may also affect the nails or the hands. It is a member of the group of diseases known as tinea.
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One way to contract athlete’s foot is to get a fungal infection somewhere else on the body first. The fungi causing athlete’s foot may spread from other areas of the body to the feet, usually by touching or scratching the affected area, thereby getting the fungus on the fingers, and then touching or scratching the feet. While the fungus remains the same, the name of the condition changes based on where on the body the infection is located. For example, the infection is known as tinea corporis (“ringworm”) when the torso or limbs are affected or tinea cruris (jock itch or dhobi itch) when the groin is affected. Clothes (or shoes), body heat, and sweat can keep the skin warm and moist, just the environment the fungus needs to thrive.
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If left untreated, there is a risk that the infection will spread from toe to toe; a rash may develop on the sides and the bottom of the feet. In rare cases, athlete’s foot can spread to the hands, this is known as tinea manuum. The symptoms are very similar to those experienced in the feet. Patients who do not wash their hands immediately after touching the affected area on their foot are at higher risk. Tinea manuum is a rare complication of athlete’s foot.
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Keeping socks and shoes clean (using bleach in the wash) is one way to prevent fungi from taking hold and spreading. Avoiding the sharing of boots and shoes is another way to prevent transmission. Athlete’s foot can be transmitted by sharing footwear with an infected person. Hand-me-downs and purchasing used shoes are other forms of shoe-sharing. Not sharing also applies to towels, because, though less common, fungi can be passed along on towels, especially damp ones.
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Athlete’s foot gets its name because athletes often get it. Why? The fungus that causes it can be found where athletes often are. The fungus grows on the warm, damp surfaces around pools, public showers, and locker rooms. People walk barefoot on these surfaces and fungus ends up on their feet. Or they might use a damp towel that has the athlete’s foot fungus on it.
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It is the most common type of fungal infection. Although it is contagious, athlete’s foot can usually be treated with OTC medication. However, individuals with a weakened immune system or diabetes should see a doctor as soon as athlete’s foot develops.
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Because athlete’s foot may itch, it may also elicit the scratch reflex, causing the host to scratch the infected area before he or she realizes it. Scratching can further damage the skin and worsen the condition by allowing the fungus to more easily spread and thrive. The itching sensation associated with athlete’s foot can be so severe that it may cause hosts to scratch vigorously enough to inflict excoriations (open wounds), which are susceptible to bacterial infection. Further scratching may remove scabs, inhibiting the healing process.